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National Film Festival Debuts Documentary About First-of-Its-Kind Blood Cancer Master Clinical Trial

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“Coloring Outside the Lines” follows the life-or-death journeys of four patients with aggressive leukemia and the groundbreaking clinical trial designed to save them

RYE BROOK, N.Y. /PRNewswire/ — The story of a clinical trial that is unlocking a new, personalized treatment approach with the power to save the lives of thousands of people living with an aggressive and deadly form of leukemia was screened at the American Public Health Association Film Festival this week. 

Coloring Outside the Lines” follows the story of four patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), their medical teams, and the scientists who created a first-of-its kind blood cancer master clinical trial that is transforming how this disease is treated.


“Coloring Outside the Lines” follows the life-or-death journeys of four patients with aggressive leukemia and the groundbreaking clinical trial designed to save them

From two-time Peabody and six-time Emmy award-winning journalists and filmmakers Geraldine Moriba and Jamila Paksima, the documentary is an eye-opening story about a group of scientific visionaries and the patients who trusted them. The film captures the stories of Dorila, Jerry, Martha and Susan, who enrolled in the Beat AML® Master Clinical Trial.

“Leading scientists saw a major unmet need in blood cancer treatment and dove in to create something the medical world had never seen before: the first collaborative precision medicine master clinical trial for blood cancer,” said E. Anders (Andy) Kolb, M.D., president and CEO of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). “It is incredible to see the stories of four patients who enrolled, and to think about the hundreds and eventually thousands of others who will benefit from our work together.”

Through their stories, the filmmakers show how the trial took a bold and innovative approach using advanced technology to examine the genetic make-up of each patient’s cancer to match them with the most promising targeted treatment. These treatments can replace chemotherapy, which can be very difficult for patients to tolerate, especially those 60 and older. These patients are most likely to get this form of cancer and face a life expectancy of just months or even weeks at diagnosis.

“Coloring Outside the Lines” was five years in the making, starting shortly after LLS launched the trial in 2016 to capture in-depth stories about how all four individuals — after given a devastating prognosis — were able to continue to enjoy their lives, hobbies, interests and extra time with their families. Today, more than 1,400 patients have joined the trial, which is improving survival rates and quality of life compared to standard chemotherapy.

In addition to the stories of individuals enrolled in the trial, the documentary also features the doctors who treated them and the scientific leaders and partners behind the trial.

“I watched my mother undergo three months of chemotherapy in 1996, and it was devastating. My work will not be over until people no longer need to experience harsh cancer treatment,” said John Byrd, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of Beat AML and Chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at University of Cincinnati. “I’m pleased to say that the Beat AML Master Clinical Trial has given me hope that we will one day accomplish this, as I have witnessed that half of the patients with a subtype of AML can take a pill and go into remission without any chemotherapy.”     

To learn more and watch the trailer, visit www.lls.org/documentary.

ABOUT THE LEUKEMIA & LYMPHOMA SOCIETY
The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society® (LLS) is the global leader in the fight against blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease, and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world, provides free information and support services, and is the voice for all blood cancer patients seeking access to quality, affordable, coordinated care.

Founded in 1949 and headquartered in Rye Brook, NY, LLS has regions throughout the United States and Canada. To learn more, visit www.LLS.org. Patients should contact the Information Resource Center at (800) 955-4572, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. ET. 

LLS is the only organization featured in the nonprofit category on both Fast Company’s 2022 Brands That Matter list and the 2023 Best Workplaces for Innovators list. LLS stands out among brands around the world for its relevancy, cultural impact, ingenuity, and mission impact. 

For additional information, visit lls.org/lls-newsnetwork. Follow us on FacebookXInstagram and LinkedIn.

About the Beat AML® Master Clinical Trial
The Beat AML® Master Clinical Trial is the first collaborative precision medicine clinical trial in a blood cancer. Launched by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in 2016 and focused on newly diagnosed patients aged 60 or older, the trial uses advanced genomic technology to match patients to the most promising targeted treatment based on their unique genetic mutations.

The trial tests multiple therapies in multiple study arms simultaneously under a “Master Trial” protocol that not only has the power to bring new therapies to acute myeloid leukemia patients faster, but also has the potential to stand as a model for future clinical trials. The trial has already generated strong results, showing superior survival rates and better quality of life when genomic analysis is used to match patients to targeted therapies. For more information, www.lls.org/beataml.

SOURCE The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS)

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Empowering Stories: TNC Network’s Positive Impact Documentary Series

Discover a refreshing alternative to fear-inducing news. Join TNC Network on their journey to showcase positivity in a world of uncertainty.

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Photo by Kyle Loftus on Pexels.com

In a world filled with uncertainty, TNC Network stands out by highlighting its positive impact. The new documentary series focuses on inspiring individuals, offering a refreshing alternative to fear-inducing mainstream media. Avoiding clickbait, TNC aims to uplift and inform. Stay tuned for the debut on STM Daily News.

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Documentary Highlights Need for Advancing Women’s Health Research

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WASHINGTON, D.C., UNITED STATES /EINPresswire.com/ — The National Institutes of Health recently presented an exclusive screening of the documentary Below the Belt to its 21,000+ employees and researchers.
Below the Belt shines a light on endometriosis, a disease that affects 200 million girls and women around the world yet remains vastly underfunded and under-researched.

The filmmaker Shannon Cohn is one of those women. Cohn partnered with executive producers Hillary Rodham Clinton, Rosario Dawson, Corinne Foxx, Mae Whitman, and the late Senator Orrin Hatch to position the film as a key part of a larger social impact campaign focused on increasing widespread awareness, improving medical education, and creating transformative policy changes in women’s health.

The documentary shows how women are often dismissed, discounted, and disbelieved in their healthcare. During the average ten years it takes to be diagnosed with endometriosis, they are often told that symptoms are in their head or part of being a woman. A greater diagnostic delay exists for women of color who are less likely to be believed, diagnosed, and effectively treated. Due to outdated notions, women with endometriosis are often treated with an array of ineffective drugs and surgeries and erroneously told that pregnancy and hysterectomy are cures. Nearly 50% of infertility cases in women are due to this disease, and almost all are preventable.

The NIH screening, hosted by Diana W. Bianchi, M.D., director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at NIH, and Janine Clayton, M.D., Director, Office of Research on Women’s Health, and NIH Associate D

irector for Research on Women’s Health, was shared with all 27 departments of the NIH Institutes and Centers that make up the National Institutes of Health.

“It is important for our society to understand the human impact of endometriosis. That is why documentaries like Below the Belt are so significant,” said Diana W. Bianchi, M.D. “Our hope is that a greater awareness of the effects of endometriosis among women in the United States and around the world will help accelerate research efforts to definitively diagnose, prevent, and treat this painful disorder.”

Director Janine Clayton, M.D., noted in a panel discussion following the screening that too often, women, and in particular women of color, are not listened to, especially when they are experiencing pain, and they are not believed.

“Unfortunately, race is a factor that sometimes results in bias and how clinicians evaluate individuals presenting with pain,” said Clayton. “It is critical that we raise awareness of that fact and necessary to interrupt the bias.”

Both NIH and Cohn are pressing Congress about the urgent need to focus on women’s health research.

“The goal is to press for a transformative amount of research funding for NIH,” said Cohn. “Researchers should be allowed to be trailblazers on a disease that impacts so many people. We must compel Congress to act on the urgent need to increase funding, not just for endometriosis but for all women’s health issues.”

NIH is working with the White House on a new initiative establishing the first-ever White House Initiative on Women’s Health Research, an effort led by First Lady Dr. Jill Biden and the White House Gender Policy Council. Its goal is to fundamentally change how the United States approaches and funds women’s health research while pioneering the next generation of discoveries in women’s health.

In a statement, the Biden administration specified that “under-investing in women’s health research can decrease women’s well-being and quality of life, hold women back in the workplace, and affect their families’ economic security. By contrast, increasing investments in women’s health research can yield broad societal gains, including lower health care costs and a more productive and inclusive workforce.”

Cohn believes the global social impact campaign around the film can help elevate the White House’s overarching mission and recently discussed the campaign’s strategic elements and goals with the White House Gender Policy Council.

Learn more about endometriosis at www.EndoWhat.com and the film at www.BelowtheBelt.film.

About Below the Belt
The documentary Below the Belt exposes widespread problems in our healthcare systems that disproportionately affect women. From societal taboos and gender bias to misinformed doctors and financial barriers to care, the film reveals how millions are silenced and how, by fighting back, we can improve healthcare for everyone. Below the Belt is streaming on PBS through June 2024.

About Shannon Cohn
Shannon Cohn is an attorney and filmmaker whose work has appeared on PBS, Discovery Channel, and Nat Geo. Her previous film, Endo What?, a feature documentary on endometriosis, was hailed by The Guardian as “film of the year” and by Newsweek as “the first step in a plan for change.”

Source: Laura Evans Media

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Porto Jewish Community to Release the Trailer to a Film About the Massacre of the Jews of Lisbon in 1506

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PORTO, Portugal (Newswire.com) – The Jewish community of Porto has released to the general public the trailer for a full-length historical film about the massacre of the Jews of Lisbon that took place in the Portuguese capital in 1506.


Mekor Haim Kadoorie synagogue in Porto, Portugal
The Porto Jewish community has been active over the past decade to promote Jewish culture, among which is the feature film “1618,” which recounts the story of the Inquisition and won the largest number of international awards for a Portuguese film.

The premiere of the film “1506,” which will be available for free viewing, will take place on April 19, 2024 – exactly 518 years since that traumatic event occurred. The film will be available in a variety of languages and platforms for online viewing.

More than 3,000 Jews were brutally murdered in the massacre between April 19 and 21,1506. A simple spark was enough for popular sentiment to cause a catastrophe. The fires into which the bodies were thrown reached the height of houses – even babies were thrown into the fire in the heart of the city, where for three days a brutal mass slaughter of the city’s Jewish residents took place.

“To know the massacre of 1506 in Lisbon is to know the events of October 7, 2023 in Israel and the historic massacres perpetrated against the Jewish people throughout Europe. The only change is the weapons used. ‘October 7 did not exist in a vacuum,’ Antonio Guterres said, and he is right,” said Gabriel Senderowicz, president of the Porto Jewish community and a member of the European Jewish Association.

The Portuguese company LightBox was chosen to produce the film, and the script recreating the historical events, written in 2021, was based on in-depth research carried out at the Alberto Benveniste Research Center for Sephardic Studies at the University of Lisbon.

The Porto Jewish community has been active over the past decade to promote Jewish culture, history and education. Among its notable achievements during this period is the feature film “1618,” which recounts the story of the Inquisition in the city and won the largest number of international awards for a Portuguese film.



The Jewish community of Porto was only officially reestablished in 1923 by Captain Barros Basto, known as the “Portuguese Dreyfus” after he was persecuted for his efforts to reestablish a Jewish community in Porto, some four centuries after it had been destroyed by the Portuguese Inquisition.

Among the important projects led by the community over the past decade are the Jewish Museum in Porto and the Holocaust Museum, which in the past two years have hosted more than 100,000 schoolchildren, constituting 10% of all schoolchildren in Portugal.

Source: The Jewish Community of Porto

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