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5 Tips for Fostering Dogs

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Photo courtesy of Adobe Stock

(Family Features) More animals are staying in shelters now than before the pandemic, according to a report from Shelter Animals Count, and just over half (53%) of dogs in shelters are adopted. However, the report also found that fostering dogs is a proven way to help pets find new homes.

For those looking to support rescue dogs in need, the PEDIGREE® brand and its FOSTERVERSE program offer tips for a positive fostering experience and show how you can help end pet homelessness. To learn more and get involved, visit Pedigree.com/Fosterverse.


Photo courtesy of Adobe Stock

Learn the Dog’s Background

Every dog has a unique personality and set of needs, which is why it’s important to learn as much as you can before fostering a dog. Try to gather detailed information from the rescue organization or animal shelter before bringing the dog home, including age, breed, health conditions, dietary needs, energy level and even likes and dislikes. Learning about your foster dog’s background ahead of time can help you prepare and ensure a smooth transition to your home.


Photo courtesy of Adobe Stock

Prepare Your Household

Spend time making your home as dog-friendly and safe as possible by keeping electronics, cleaning supplies, sharp objects and other potentially dangerous items out of the way. This may mean taking a look at items in your home from the dog’s eye level to see what might be within reach. If you will be introducing a foster dog to other pets in your household, try to provide ample space to allow for slow introductions. Also consider looking for ways to designate spaces and belongings (like beds) between your pets so they can have comfortable places to retreat and rest.


Photo courtesy of Adobe Stock

Train for Eventual Adoption

Once your foster dog has adjusted to the new environment, consider gradually implementing routines. These routines may include activities like obedience training, physical exercise, house training and crate training. Teaching your foster pup good habits in preparation for adoption can increase the likelihood of finding a forever home.


Photo courtesy of Adobe Stock

Market Your Foster Dog

Spread the word in your community in person and on social media that you are fostering and helping find a forever home for your four-legged friend. A survey from AdoptAPet.com revealed the simple act of sharing information on social media about adoptable pets at local shelters can save a pet’s life, with 8 out of 10 (84%) organizations reporting that sharing pet content online increases the likelihood of pets being adopted. Help get the word out and show your community members why they should consider adopting your foster pup.

Try Virtual Fostering

While many people might want to foster a pup, there are many factors that may not allow them to foster pets in real life. That’s why the PEDIGREE brand is bringing fostering opportunities to the Metaverse for anyone who owns a digital property in Decentraland, offering a new platform for dog adoption. Users may interact with dogs they meet in the FOSTERVERSE program and learn about their backgrounds and adoption status, as well as ways to support dogs in need across the country. Dog lovers can choose to adopt a dog they meet virtually through AdoptAPet.com or donate to PEDIGREE Foundation to help similar adoptable pets in need across the country.


SOURCE:
Pedigree

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  • Rebecca Washington

    Rebecca Jo is a mother of four and is a creative soul from Phoenix, Arizona, who also enjoys new adventures. Rebecca Jo has a passion for the outdoors and indulges in activities like camping, fishing, hunting and riding roller coasters. She is married to Rod Washington

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Rebecca Jo is a mother of four and is a creative soul from Phoenix, Arizona, who also enjoys new adventures. Rebecca Jo has a passion for the outdoors and indulges in activities like camping, fishing, hunting and riding roller coasters. She is married to Rod Washington

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Preparing for Your First Pet: 5 tips for new pet owners

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a dog sitting on a person's lap. Pet

(Family Features) Welcoming a new pet into your family can be an exciting addition, but preparation is required to provide a loving home and enjoy the unconditional love of a four-legged family member.

To help prepare your furry friend for the transition to a new living arrangement, consider these essential tips for first-time pet owners.

Choose the Right Pet for Your Lifestyle
When getting a pet for the first time, it’s crucial to select one that fits your lifestyle. Consider your living situation, work schedule and personal preferences. Research different breeds to find the one that matches your activity level, living space and family dynamics. Some pets require more exercise and attention while others are more independent. Also consider any allergies or sensitivities you or your family members may have as some pets may trigger allergies or asthma symptoms.

Set Up Your Home
Before bringing your new pet home, create a safe and comfortable environment. Start by pet-proofing your home, removing any hazardous substances and securing loose wires or cords. Make sure to store cleaning supplies, medications and toxic plants out of reach. Provide a designated space that includes a cozy bed or crate, food and water bowls and toys. Cats may need a litter box, scratching post and place to climb or hide. Dogs may require a fenced yard or designated area for bathroom breaks. Also consider restricting access to certain areas of your home, especially during the initial adjustment period, with a pet gate to help prevent accidents or damage to belongings.

Create a Routine
Pets thrive on routine. Establish a consistent schedule for feeding, exercise and bathroom breaks. Determine the appropriate amount and frequency of meals for your pet’s age, size and breed. Dogs may require daily walks, playtime or trips to the dog park. Cats can benefit from interactive toys and vertical spaces like cat trees. Remember to spend quality time with your pet every day, providing attention, affection and mental stimulation, which can help strengthen the bond between you and your pet and ensure overall happiness and well-being.

Budget for Your Pet’s Needs
Owning a pet comes with financial responsibilities. Consider the costs of food, grooming, veterinary care, vaccinations and preventive medications, factoring in research based on the average costs of owning a pet of your chosen breed. Additionally, factor in the cost of toys, bedding, litter and other supplies. It’s also recommended to set aside a contingency fund for unexpected veterinary bills or emergencies that may arise.

Find a Reliable Veterinarian
Regular check-ups and open communication with a local veterinarian can help detect any potential health issues early and ensure your pet receives the best possible care. When searching for a provider, ask friends, family or neighbors who have pets for recommendations and read reviews before scheduling visits to potential veterinarians’ offices to meet the staffs, tour the facilities and ask any questions you may have. Ensure the veterinarian offers a wide range of services, including preventive care, vaccinations, spaying/neutering, dental care and emergency services. Consider the location and hours of operation to ensure convenience and accessibility for routine visits and emergencies.

Find more tips for welcoming a furry friend into your home at eLivingtoday.com.

Photo courtesy of Unsplash


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eLivingtoday.com

https://stmdailynews.com/category/lifestyle/pets

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How to Support Your Pet’s Health During Summer

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Pet parents

(Family Features) As a pet parent, you know your pet’s needs are continually evolving. That’s true during different stages of growth and even as the seasons change.

Part of supporting your pet throughout the year is understanding the specific risks that come with changing weather and special seasonal events. Supporting pets this summer can be easier with these tips:

Summer Health Concerns
It may be an exciting time of year for humans with all the extra activities, seasonal celebrations and travel, but those summer pastimes can add up to a whole lot of stress for pets. In addition, environmental factors like allergens and heat can affect them more than you realize.

  • Allergies: Pets can be affected by many of the same allergens as humans, including grass, pollen and other vegetation that is more prevalent during warmer months. Watch for signs of trouble such as scratching, chewing, watery eyes and general discomfort. Veterinarians can offer advice on allergy support and supplements appropriate for your pet’s age, breed and size.
  • Fireworks: Summer tends to bring more loud noise and commotion in general, but this is especially true around the Fourth of July when explosions become the norm. If pets are fearful, it’s especially important to ensure they stay in well-secured areas since fireworks are a common cause of pets running away. If possible, find a safe spot within your house where outside noises are muffled. Provide some comfort items and check on them regularly. If they seem extremely distressed, vet-recommended anxiety treatments and supplements can help promote relaxation and soothe their nerves.
  • Travel: If your pet suffers from separation anxiety, summer trips can be especially problematic. One solution is to take your pet with you, but that’s not always practical or even possible. When pets with separation anxiety stay behind, it’s a good idea to leave them with someone they know, and even better if that person can stay in your home so pets are in familiar surroundings. If that’s not an option, introducing pets to their caretaker or doing a trial run at the kennel can help ease their nerves. In extreme cases, you may need to consult with a vet about supplements that can help soothe pets in your absence.
  • Dehydration: Just like humans, hotter temperatures make it easier to get dehydrated, which can lead to myriad health concerns. Ensure pets have access to fresh, clean and cool water at all times and be sure to alert your veterinarian if you notice any changes in their interest in drinking, as that can signal an issue. Also watch for signs of dehydration, such as weakness, less energy, changes in appetite and panting.

Managing Activity Levels
During the summer months, pets may be tempted to take it easy in the heat, or you may have the opposite problem: a pet that’s a little too active for the elements. Monitoring their activity level is important to ensure they don’t get overheated but also get adequate exercise to maintain a healthy weight and keep muscle tone strong. This may require getting creative about bringing playtime indoors or shifting your routine to accommodate walks early or late in the day when temperatures tend to be more forgiving.

Introducing Health Supplements
Monitoring pets’ health isn’t a one-size-fits-all effort. In fact, different breeds have distinct needs when it comes to exercise, behavioral training and even nutrition. Supplements, from multifunctional solutions to those targeting specific issues, can help complement regular food to ensure pets are getting all of the nutrients and preventative support they need to thrive. One comprehensive option is NaturVet’s Breed Specific Soft Chews supplement line, which is made up of five products that provide proactive support for distinct dog breed categories, including toy/small, bully, sport/working, doodle and giant.

The vet-formulated soft chew line was designed to offer a streamlined and personalized supplement approach for breeds with particular health needs. To support pets precisely as they are, each product offering is formulated for pure and mixed breed dogs alike, delivering tailored, wholesome ingredients to address joint, allergy, immune, heart, gut, anxiety and dental issues.  

Find more advice for supporting your pet’s health this summer and beyond at naturvet.com.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock (woman hugging dog)


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NaturVet

Bully Sticks
https://stmdailynews.com/preparing-for-your-first-pet-5-tips-for-new-pet-owners/

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More Than Half of Campers Bring Their Dogs (And Some Bring Cats)

“We often run The Dyrt remotely from our camper van and Brandy, aka The Dyrt Dog, is with us for every mile,” says Sarah Smith, founder of The Dyrt.

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PORTLAND, Ore. /PRNewswire/ — The Dyrt, the No. 1 app for camping availability, photos and reviews, has found that more than half of campers camped with dogs in 2023. The Dyrt’s 2024 Camping Report presented by The All-New Toyota Tacoma revealed that 53.7% of campers brought their pooches to the campsite last year.

While dogs are by far the most popular pet to camp with, 5.8% of respondents said they went camping with cats. Other campers reported bringing along chickens, box turtles, guinea pigs and parrots.

Photo Credit: The Dyrt camper Brandy C. at Fall Creek Falls State Park in Tennessee

“We often run The Dyrt remotely from our camper van and Brandy, aka The Dyrt Dog, is with us for every mile,” says Sarah Smith, founder of The Dyrt. “Sometimes it seems like she has to pack more gear than us, but it’s so amazing to have her with us 24/7 as we work and enjoy campgrounds across the country.”

Property owners and campground managers worked to accommodate dogs as well as campers in 2023. Dog parks were the third-most popular amenity to be added to campgrounds, behind only Wi-Fi and pickleball courts. And non-human companions are especially prevalent in the RV camping community, as RV campers were 20.8% more likely to camp with pets.

“I love taking my dog Lola with me camping because to me it reminds me of the quintessential Americana where an individual is hiking on a trail or sleeping under the stars with their beloved friend,” says The Dyrt camper Steven M. of Utah. “When Lola sees me packing up the camper and truck, she starts her little zoomies happy dance. The bond we share while out in nature or in the middle of nowhere is priceless. Also, camping and dogs go together like pancakes and syrup!”

Bringing dogs and cats on camping trips was most prevalent in Washington, where campers were 8% more likely to camp with dogs and 24% more likely to camp with cats.

Each year The Dyrt presents the Top 9 for K-9s list of best places to camp with dogs, largely based on reviews and amenities tailored to the tailed. The 2024 list will be released in July. There are more than 12 million reviews of 70,000 campgrounds on The Dyrt, and some of them include dog- and pet-specific information that is extremely helpful for planning camping trips when being accompanied by four-legged friends.

About The Dyrt

The Dyrt is the only comprehensive camping app with over 12 million user-generated reviews, photos and tips for RV sites, cabins, glamping and tent camping locations, including all public, private and free camping areas in the United States. The Dyrt is how campers find and book camping of any type anywhere in the U.S. With The Dyrt PRO, campers get reservations at sold-out campgrounds, advanced maps, discounts on camping and more. The Dyrt is the most downloaded camping app in both the iOS and Android app stores. The Dyrt helps millions of campers find “camping near me” — download The Dyrt app today.

Photo Credit: The Dyrt camper Brandy C. at Fall Creek Falls State Park in Tennessee

SOURCE The Dyrt

Bully Sticks

https://stmdailynews.com/category/lifestyle/pets

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